Times of Oman
Oman technology: Jurassic Watch - A 150-million year heritage on your wrist
July 23, 2017 | 7:10 PM
by Times News Service
The mechanical heart of the Jurassic Watch is the certified Mecanograph chronometer.
 
Sharelines

As every fan of Ateliers Louis Moinet knows, the firm loves all things beautiful, unusual and exceptional. On its Mecanograph City watches, it was the first to include fragments of lunar meteorites and other rocks from the far-flung corners of the universe. Meanwhile, the Treasures of the World collection has opened up another creative path: that of dials made from rare, fossilised stones of mineral or plant origin, including petrified exotic wood.

These two unique approaches have now been combined in the Jurassic Watch, derived from the Mecanograph family, is the first to feature a dial made from Jurassic-era dinosaur bone – between 145 and 200 million years old.

The mechanical heart of the Jurassic Watch is the certified Mecanograph chronometer. This proprietary movement has been exclusively developed by Ateliers Louis Moinet. This unique timepiece comes with a 43.5mm case made from rose gold. Date at 3 o’clock, seconds hand at 9 o’clock on the dial with a concentric Clou de Paris pattern, limited edition of 12 watches. It boasts not only extraordinary precision, but also a dial made from a genuine fossilised 150-million-year-old dinosaur bone.

In another first, the calibre features a date window located at 3 o’clock. It also uses the exclusive Energie Plus process, unveiled by Louis Moinet at Baselworld. Specific craftsmanship is vital for the production of each dial. It begins with the choice of the right stone; this needs to be sufficiently dense to be worked on, taking into account its final size and texture. The ensuing handiwork takes over a week – and results in a dial thickness of just 0.65mm.



The dinosaur bone in question, discovered in North America, has been authenticated by renowned geologist Dr Andreas Stucki in association with the Aathal Dinosaur Museum in Switzerland. The dinosaur bone is from the family of large herbivores, which also includes the Diplodocus.

[email protected]

STAY UPDATED
Subscribe to our newsletter and be the first to know all the latest news